Glasgow Mela and umbrella

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मेला

Mela (Sanskrit: मेला) is a Sanskrit word meaning ‘gathering’ or ‘to meet’ or a ‘fair’. It is used in the Indian subcontinent for all sizes of gatherings and can be religious, commercial, cultural or sport-related.

Glasgow Mela is a multicultural family festival, based on the traditions of the Indian Sub-continent. Set up in 1990 when Glasgow was European City of Culture, the Mela has grown from being an indoor event at Tramway to an outdoor extravaganza with over 50,000 people attending.

                       Today was the second day of the festival and no one cares about rain.

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My day full of yellow-coloured objects appears to be gold.  I always have habit to find  art conservation everywhere. Also Today you will be surprised how  India yellow patterns show the short distance between Glasgow and Calcutta.

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This India yellow pattern with Indian Yellow colour from Indian Yellow a pigment is a legend and mystery.  This pigment colour is also known as C.I. Natural Yellow 20, Gaugoli, Giallo Indiano, Peori, euxanthic acid, Purree and Purée of India.  Since ancient times in the Far East, Indian yellow was introduced into India from Persia in the fifteenth century. The amateur painter, Roger Dewhurst, recorded the use of Indian yellow in 1786. He noted, in letters to friends, that it was an organic substance made from the urine of animals fed on turmeric and suggested that it should be washed to prepare it for use as a pigment. Its source remained a mystery for many years. Mérimée, in his book on painting of 1830, didn’t believe it was made from urine, in spite of its odor. George Field believed it was made from camel urine. It was not until 1886 that the Journal of the Society of Arts in London embarked on a systematic inquiry of the pigment known as purée of India. An investigator began his search at Calcutta. He was sent to Monghyr, a city in Bengal. There, he found a small group of cattle owners who fed their cows on mango leaves and water.

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The cows’ urine was a bright yellow. They were extremely undernourished as they only received normal fodder occasionally. Other Indian dairy cattle farmers of the same caste despised these ‘colourmen’ and limited their production. They were reportedly producing one thousand to fifteen hundred pounds of the pigment per year but the investigator doubted the production figures when he saw the small number of cows involved.

Due to the color and urine like smell, Indian Yellow had long been rumored to be made from urine of cattle or camels, but the true nature of the pigment was a not really known. The process of making it was kept a secret and there was apparently only one main source for the colour, manufactured by an ”

My day full of yellow-coloured objects appears to be gold.  I always have habit to find  art conservation everywhere. Also Today you will be surprised how  India yellow patterns show the short distance between Glasgow and Calcutta.

This India yellow pattern with Indian Yellow colour from Indian Yellow a pigment is a legend and mystery.  This pigment colour is also known as C.I. Natural Yellow 20, Gaugoli, Giallo Indiano, Peori, euxanthic acid, Purree and Purée of India.  Since ancient times in the Far East, Indian yellow was introduced into India from Persia in the fifteenth century. The amateur painter, Roger Dewhurst, recorded the use of Indian yellow in 1786. He noted, in letters to friends, that it was an organic substance made from the urine of animals fed on turmeric and suggested that it should be washed to prepare it for use as a pigment. Its source remained a mystery for many years. Mérimée, in his book on painting of 1830, didn’t believe it was made from urine, in spite of its odor. George Field believed it was made from camel urine. It was not until 1886 that the Journal of the Society of Arts in London embarked on a systematic inquiry of the pigment known as purée of India. An investigator began his search at Calcutta. He was sent to Monghyr, a city in Bengal. There, he found a small group of cattle owners who fed their cows on mango leaves and water. The cows’ urine was a bright yellow. They were extremely undernourished as they only received normal fodder occasionally. Other Indian dairy cattle farmers of the same caste despised these ‘colourmen’ and limited their production. They were reportedly producing one thousand to fifteen hundred pounds of the pigment per year but the investigator doubted the production figures when he saw the small number of cows involved.

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Cow urine ?????, now in the Indian market as a soft drink. The price Rs 1.20

Due to the color and urine like smell, Indian Yellow had long been rumored to be made from urine of cattle or camels, but the true nature of the pigment was a not really known. The process of making it was kept a secret and there was apparently only one main source for the colour, manufactured by an “Englishman in Calcutta”.

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The Milkmaid was painted by Johannes Vermeer in about 1657–58. The small picture (18 x 16 1/8 in., or 45.5 x 41 cm) could be described as one of the last works of the Delft artist’s formative years (ca. 1654–58)

The Milkmaid c.1660… wrote that Johannes Vermeer  (1632-1675) worked slowly and with great care, using bright colours and sometimes expensive pigments, with a preference for lapis lazuli and Indian yellow, undeniably and exemplified in this work. He is particularly renowned for his masterly treatment and use of light in his work. Against the deep blue folds of heavy fabric, the dots of pigment reflect an alchemist transformation. Vermeer acts like the alchemist, creating objects of greater worth from light and pigment, not only with the pearls but the painting as a whole.

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                                                                                                  Glasgow Ella, Glasgow Mela and ………..no umbrella 🙂

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About conservationwithella

Hello, I'm Ella, Art on Paper Conservator & Preservation Manager at Glasgow University Archives and Special Collections. This blog is a walk through my daily life, work, arts & crafts history, my discovery that everything in my life is enough to be a continuous source of reflection. I started blogging to entertain myself but I hope you enjoy it too. I'm sure you agree, that Life without art is nothing. :)

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